2020 Best Work From Home Jobs

Working from home is becoming a major perk for many people in today’s world. More companies are offering jobs that can be done from home than ever before.

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Work From Home Jobs

As technology improves at incredible speeds, so does the ability of people to work and even run businesses from home. Some companies have embraced this world more easily than others, but all should know it’s a major perk to many employees.

Some companies have gone as far as having a 100% distributed workforce. That’s the term these days for a company that has no physical headquarters, with employees distributed around the country.

It makes a lot of sense for employees and employers. Both stand to save money by having people work from home. Employees by not having to spend on travel, eating out, and after school care for kids. Employers by not having a lot of physical overhead incurred by companies with physical locations.

Related: Find a New Career at 40

So you’re looking for a career change, and want to work from home here are some of the jobs to consider.

Contents

Best Work From Home Jobs

Median Salary:

$82,240

Typical Education:

High school diploma or equivalent

Employed 2018:

40,700

Median Salary:

$55,190

Typical Education:

High school diploma or equivalent

Employed 2018:

715,400

Median Salary:

$74,820

Typical Education:

Associate’s degree

Employed 2018:

219,800

Median Salary:

$33,610

Typical Education:

Postsecondary nondegree award

Employed 2018:

686,600

Median Salary:

$32,700

Typical Education:

High school diploma or equivalent

Employed 2018:

420,400

Median Salary:

$47,300

Typical Education:

Postsecondary nondegree award

Employed 2018:

112,100

Median Salary:

$84,280

Typical Education:

Bachelor’s degree

Employed 2018:

250,300

Median Salary:

$103,620

Typical Education:

Bachelor’s degree

Employed 2018:

944,200

Median Salary:

$39,390

Typical Education:

High school diploma or equivalent

Employed 2018:

86,600

Median Salary:

$100,770

Typical Education:

Master’s degree

Employed 2018:

18,300

Median Salary:

$69,430

Typical Education:

Associate’s degree

Employed 2018:

160,500

Median Salary:

$50,600

Typical Education:

High school diploma or equivalent

Employed 2018:

475,900

Median Salary:

$50,370

Typical Education:

Bachelor’s degree

Employed 2018:

290,100

Median Salary:

$62,170

Typical Education:

Bachelor’s degree

Employed 2018:

123,200

Benefits of Working From Home

Health – Without a doubt, one of the biggest benefits of working from home is avoiding illness. That holds true any time but is especially relevant in today’s world when Covid-19 is having a huge impact on the health of the world. Hopefully, companies will learn that not only can avoid severe illnesses like COVID, but also minor colds and flu’s, reducing the amount of sick time for employees.

Commute time – Every person who does not work at home, has to endure a commute. The average commute in the U.S. according to the U.S. Census Bureau is 26.1 minutes one-way. That means most people are spending an hour in the car, bus, or train when they could have been working or spending time with family. That’s a lot of hours when you stack them up across every workday of the year.

Time with family – That leads us right into increased time with family. Think of all the time spent around the “water cooler” chatting with co-workers. Imagine if that time could be spent having a conversation with a child or spouse. The ability just to have lunch with family instead of co-workers could do wonders for some people’s home life.

Less eating out – One of the main drivers of the health crisis in the U.S. over the last few decades has been attributed to fast food and eating out. Working from home would take that need away. Not that all meals at home are uber nutritious, but most are better in calories than a burger, fries, and over-sized soda.

After school care – With the uptick in dual-income families, has come a need to put children in after school care programs. Not only does that take money, but it takes away valuable time spent with your children. Working from home would eliminate the need for a certain percentage of after school care. That’s a win-win for both child and parent alike.

Related: High Demand Trade Jobs

Cons of Working from Home

Socialization – One thing many people have learned is that time outside of the family is critical. Too much time in the house can drive some people mad, and going to work often offers that escape. With the adoption of more work at home, opportunities will come the need for some to find other ways to decompress out of the house.

Face time – There is an unmistakable benefit to doing some things face-to-face. You can’t read reactions the same way, or have the same effective conversation in some instances while on conference calls. The good news is that in today’s world of Skype and Zoom, we are better positioned than ever to have remote meetings that feel more personal than they might have ten years ago.

Management – This is the one your old school manager spends his/her night awake worrying about. How in the world will I manage people to get the same productivity? It’s a valid concern. In a work at home world, the measurement of productivity will need to change. It will need to become a measure of actual work output, rather than a more subjective measure of seeing someone in the office working. That too could turn out to be a benefit to many companies. Because for many jobs, no one should care when the work gets done, but just that it gets done in a quality manner by a certain deadline. Managers and companies need to embrace this thinking, and in the long run, might get more work productivity from a large percentage of employees.  

The Bottom Line

Yes, there’s an accelerated need and desire for people to find work from home jobs due to Covid-19. But regardless of that short-term effect, it has been a growing perk for many years.

With technologies that enable remote communication to continue to grow, it becomes easier every year. On top of capabilities, some businesses are also realizing the cost-benefit. If distributed workforces can be managed effectively, major overhead savings can be had.

And employees stand to benefit on many fronts. As more and more families find themselves with two working parents, time with kids is a major consideration.  With the average one-way commute taking 26 minutes, parents lose an hour a day with family. Not to mention the cost of travel, eating out, office attire, and more.

Given the current situation, it seems the time has come for more companies to find permanent work from home solutions.

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines, or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Disclaimer: The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

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